cannot access a folder

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Solved cannot access a folder

Post by hairyboy on Wed Mar 05, 2008 10:32 am

I’m running XP, The hard disk on my new system has four partitions, all NTFS, and each of them has the folder System Volume Information. When I click them in Windows Explorer I’m told ‘Access denied.’ This didn’t happen on my old system and I get fidgety when my machine gets difficult, even if it’s not important.

I’m the only user and therefore have supervisor rights – I think! Is there a setting that’s missing?

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Solved Re: cannot access a folder

Post by Doctor Inferno on Wed Mar 05, 2008 10:34 am

Would I be correct in assuming your last system was running FAT32 partitions?


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Solved Re: cannot access a folder

Post by hairyboy on Wed Mar 05, 2008 10:35 am

yes.....

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Solved Re: cannot access a folder

Post by Doctor Inferno on Wed Mar 05, 2008 10:51 am

NTFS introduces file protection and key system folders like System Volume Information are therefore locked by default. This folder contains information about your System Restore points, which is why it’s a good idea to leave well alone.

If, however, you’d like to see what’s inside, you can do so by tweaking the file permissions for this folder.

Click Start -> Run, type cmd and press [Return]. Now type the following, pressing [Return] to gain access to the folder and replace Username with your username (note that if your username contains spaces – for example, Michael Carter – then you need to enclose it in double quotation marks: “Michael Carter”):

cacls “c:\System Volume Information” /E /G Username:F

If you want to reset the permissions, just type the following, again replacing Username with your own username:

cacls “c:\System Volume Information” /E /R Username

Windows XP Professional users can gain access by right-click the System Volume Information folder and choosing Properties (or Sharing and Security if you’re on a domain). Click the Add button and enter your username before clicking OK twice. You should now have access.


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